Year of the Hendrickson: February 11th 1915


Roy Steenrod
Courtesy of Dette Trout Flies

Bradley, N.Y
February 11, 1915

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
I was glad to send you some more S.D. feather. Don’t forget to tie a few light Cahills, with gray body. Wool will do all right.
Theodore Gordon

Bradley, N.Y
February 11, 1915

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
If the light was extra good I could, I believe, tie flies for an hour or two in the evening, as supper is my best meal. I dislike red deer fat or any kind of grease on my line, but I got a dressing called Mucilin from a Mr. Aspinall, in Bolton, 1 dox. Boxes; gave most of them to friends, and all liked the stuff. I kept a worn out line going last season with it by dressing before I went out. He is a nice man who has a big chemist’s business. This is just a little side line. I enclose a few Modele Perfect, without eyes. I attach strong single gut loops to the others and tied flies on them. Good.
Theodore Gordon

Bradley, N.Y
February 11, 1915

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
Turn to pages 249-250-251-252 of Hardy’s Catalogue for their light rods. About 1904 they were forced by patriotic Englishmen to try to equal American light but powerful rods, and plenty of Leonards and Paynes were sent to them as patterns.

The Judges at the trial said that both Allcock and Hardy equaled the American rods, but some good dry-fly men do not think so. I am dead tired. Have not tied a fly yet, and have so many other things to do. Received a beautiful lot of colored pictures of the City of London from Mr. Marston this afternoon. They are very fine, and such a big bunch.

Hildebrandt sent me samples of his black line. Looks good but I don’t claim to be expert on the up-to-date bait-casting line. . .
Theodore Gordon

Edited by John McDonald, by permission of Theodore Gordon Flyfishers.

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