Year of the Hendrickson: March 5th 1915


Roy Steenrod
Courtesy of Dette Trout Flies

Bradley, N.Y
March 5, 1915

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
There is quite some work to be done, and I have not time or strength to do one half the things I wish to. Do not judge by the outside. When I read that part of your letter on the vast number of things I was getting and then looked at the green tin box, the minnow and the trifles from A. & F., I was compelled to laugh. The contrast between your idea and the reality was so great. I sent you the Field. It is spoiled a good deal by the war news, which properly has no place in it, but there are a few good things in it even now.

I see that A. and F. have those centrifugal hooks. Years ago I used a few and they were good; I ordered one dozen on gut. They are sharp and fine. I have large hooks on gut and [all the] swivels, sinkers, three way swivels, and every little thing of that sort I could think of. I have cut out too much work for myself on flies, etc. to travel behind a spinner or spoon. The Bumblepuppy is very good, dressed quite large. Out west they seem strong for the Red Fly or Scarlet Ibis bug. It is had as stone, made like a bait. Another bright day. I hope your cold is in the discard.

Theodore Gordon

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
Hooks are the devil. I buy a good many from Mills but they are Hall’s up turned eye. I prefer these hooks usually for flies smaller than No. 12. At Claryville I ordered a lot of special fine wire, so called, Modele Perfect hooks made by Allcock of Redditch. They have a big bend and big twist but the quality is very good. Last Fall I ordered 2 sizes, without twist. You see, I have to take 1,000 of a size to get any at all and I am out a lot of money on a small assortment of hooks. For all small flies the Hall’s eyed (turned up), made by Hutchinson, are best to my taste. They are the original dry-fly hook worked out by Mr. H. S. Hall many years ago. Several of the best dry fly men in England assisted him advice. They are not made over there of large size as they are used exclusively for floating flies, but here they are often used wet. They take such a good grip and hook well. But their qualities show up only in the small sizes.

Theodore Gordon

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
I am afraid that I will not be able to cast from the reel for some time. My last casting was done with big rods and quite heavy sinkers on the Coast in salt water. A different thing from bass casting. Darling is very strong on a good reel and easy starting. Have everything else (he says) as common and cheap as you please, but buy a good reel. He was very successful as a Tournament bait caster, with the short rod, and has had immense experience. In flies for bass he likes Red Ibis, Royal Coachman… and Babcock. I give his opinion at length as he is a very practical sort of man, but he is greatly prejudiced against some fine American and all English rods. I judge that he likes a very different kind of action. Wants his rods to spring from the butt.

Theodore Gordon

Dear Mr. Steenrod:
… If you can get the right sort of attractors to spin before the bait or fly you can take pickerel when they seem very indifferent…

Theodore Gordon

Edited by John McDonald, by permission of Theodore Gordon Flyfishers.

Share Button